The Costs of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

In 2018, we are steps closer to 1984 becoming a reality. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is more than a dream imagined on the pages of a novel. And, many of us dismiss the significance of AI and how its use presents risks that may outweigh its benefits. This article discusses recent AI developments and their potential adverse impact upon society.

AI exists almost everywhere. If you own a Smart TV, you interface with AI. If you own a car, you likely have AI involved in its operation. If you eat food that is genetically engineered, you are ingesting the byproduct of AI. If you use internet search engines, your search suggestions and results are AI. But, AI does more than provide modern conveniences.

AI competes with human intelligence. It has the ability to perform jobs held by humans. It has the ability to distract and lower human performance. It presents a risk to the advancement of the human race. And, the use of AI shifted the World economy to rely upon knowledge as a stronger currency than money.

In the United States, for example, there are jobs requiring specialized skills, but labor must be imported to fulfill them. These jobs offer higher compensation and demand a higher level of knowledge the average American does not possess. As a result companies must rely upon those outside of the United States or AI to fulfill their positions.

Persons relying upon factory jobs or vocational skills, cannot compete in the marketplace. AI can perform such jobs at a lower cost. Society must lower its reliance upon AI in order to move forward. This may be achieved through increasing our knowledge.

To increase our knowledge, we must be committed to learning. Less television. More quiet time. Consume less noise. Spend more time creating. And, more time invested in reading.

“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” — Alvin Toffler

Michael Simmons, a speaker and teacher focused upon the importance of individual learning and reading, explained the “5-Hour Rule: If you’re not spending 5 hours per week learning, you’re being irresponsible,” in a popular article published on Medium.

Below are six essential skills, Simmons believes one should acquire to master the knowledge economy.

1. Identify valuable knowledge at the right time.

2. Learn and master that knowledge quickly.

3. Communicate the value of your skills to others.

4. Convert knowledge into money and results.

5. Learn how to financially invest in learning to get the highest return.

6. Master the skill of learning how to learn.

The long-term effects of intellectual complacency are just as insidious as the long-term effects of not exercising, eating well, or sleeping enough. Not learning at least 5 hours per week (the 5-hour rule) is the smoking of the 21st century and this article is the warning label.

-Michael Simmons

In a perfect society, AI only helps to make it better for everyone. We get more functional phones, efficient cars, access to knowledge, better healthcare and scientific developments. But, the danger of AI creating an illiterate society is real.

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